• Pancho Rabbit and the Coyote

    Congratulations to the winner of my first August Giveaway – Amazing Books to Help Students Meet New Americans. One Good Thing about America by Ruth Freeman goes to a teacher in New Hampshire.  This week, it’s a story of migrations for the youngest of readers,  Duncan Tonathiu’s Pancho Rabbit and the Coyote. It’s an award winning hardback picture book, perfect for libraries. I’m reposting my original review that appeared in The Pirate Tree, Social Justice and Children’s Literature.

    READ MORE

  • Books to help kids and teens meet new Americans

    Warren St. John, writer of Outcasts United about a  soccer team made up of refugee kids in Clarkson, Georgia said “children live in this fantastic mosaic of society.”  His hope for the book was that people “might risk the awkwardness of interacting with someone unlike themselves.”   The coach of the team he profiled, Luma Mufleh, recently gave a Ted Talk  called, “Don’t Feel Sorry for Refugees, Believe in Them”.  She invites us to understand the background or refugees and the significance of their success in the world.

    READ MORE

  • Students Design their Own Joseph and Whoosh

    Joseph and Whoosh, of Joseph’s Big Ride, and I were invited to Lawrence Public Library’s wild and wonderful summer story series.  Kids from all over the city and their teachers trek to the library!  Thanks Jazmine and Niko Welch for playing Whoosh and Joseph in our storytelling.  Afterwards, though, I found out the art that people bring to coloring sheets. I brought a Whoosh (Dominican American) and a Joseph (born in South Sudan) sheet. How about young Giovanni’s Joseph with a block cut.  Thank you Lois Eliot, Children’s Room Coordinator, for the beautiful Children’s Library you have created.

    Book artist Ken Daley, wish you’d been there.

     

     

     

     

     

  • Reading Ruby with New Americans

    Ruby Nell Bridges at age 6, was the first African American child to attend William Franz Elementary School in New Orleans after Federal courts ordered the desegregation of public schools.

    One of the jobs I cherish doing is bringing NH Humanities’ book discussion programs to English Language Learners.I met with Christine Powers’ class of adult learners in Salem, New Hampshire this spring. They were all new Americans and also mothers. We met in the school where their kids go. Together we read a series of illustrated biographies including The Story of Ruby Bridges by Robert Coles, the psychologist who wrote The Moral Life of Children. READ MORE