A Good, Good Year for Joseph and Whoosh in Joseph’s Big Ride

A Good, Good Year for Joseph and Whoosh in Joseph’s Big Ride
Ken Daley’s gorgeous illustration of Mama, Joseph, Whoosh with ALL her hair, and the bike in Joseph’s Big Ride.

“The narrative, which focuses on building a friendship, is paired with Daley’s vibrant illustrations, which depict just how fast the minds, and bikes, of young children can go…An ideal addition…”                      School Library Journal

This has been a good, good year for my characters, Joseph and Whoosh, in Joseph’s Big Ride.  Their bike – the one Joseph FINALLY gets to ride, his wish come true! – came to life in a school in Westbrook, Maine. Master’s of Education students at the  Maine College of Art made it happen with an Art Lesson they did with the students beginning with drawing lots of kids’ hands and the connected hands become the spokes of the bicycle’s wheels.  Like this….

Then like this…

Then all the children’s hands come together like this….

The children and these extraordinary art teachers put Joseph’s – really Whoosh’s (but she likes him) – bike all together like this…

You can see the steps to make the bike is this gallery of images and videos. The Art Lessons for Joseph’s Big Ride are created as part of a tool kit for a collection of children’s books called the,  Welcoming Library

Libraries and community centers can purchase the Welcoming Library of children’s books, mobile exhibit, and program resources to help new Americans and U.S.-born families in the neighborhood  meet each other through story.  See all the books and meet the creator, Kirsten Cappy, champion of books and children, at Welcoming Library.   

A Welcoming Library display in Maine.

 

 Joseph’s Big Ride also comes to Dads in correctional facilities to help parents connect with their kids through stories

I had to get this for my daughter. She’s got hair just like Whoosh.

Dad at Concord State Prison

The Children’s Literacy Foundation (CLiF) gives brand-new children’s books to incarcerated parents in New Hampshire and Vermont prisons to support family literacy.  I’m one of the writers who visits schools and prisons to tell stories and talk about reading.  We imagine ways to read aloud to their kids which parents can do, depending on the facility, by Skype, phone call, or making a recording.  CLiF also gives children brand-new books in schools and community centers. I’ve brought Joseph’s joyful tale to many, many children in schools in immigrant neighborhoods. 

With students at Dr. Norman Crisp School, Nashua, New Hampshire 

Meet OD 

Finally, for this good, good year for Joseph and Whoosh,  South Sudanese rapper, OD Bonny and I  have teamed up to write a new story for Joseph called AII YEE, JOSEPH!  I first met OD when he wrote a tribute song, “A Girl from Juba”  for Viola,  the heroine of my novel in verse, THE GOOD BRAIDER.  I am very excited to work with this talented singer and storyteller who brings his music around the world to the Acholi people and all of us. 

OD Bonny, on the go

This One’s for the Moms and Dads: Tell Me More

This One’s for the Moms and Dads:  Tell Me More

I have the great fortune to spend this year with New Hampshire Humanities. We’re working on a literacy project with adult education and refugee resettlement classes for English learners.  The project is A Year of New Voices,  

In the Year of New Voices, professional writers will meet English learners in Connections book discussion programs. Selected students will have an opportunity to work with the writer, read samples of each other’s work, look for ideas that each have as a thread through their writing. Then English learners, alongside professional writers, will read their poems, stories, and memoirs in “Year of New Voices” readings in New Hampshire communities.

So, in order to do this, we created a handbook, “Tell Me More” on Encouraging and Developing the Voices of English Learners.

The collage is by Linda Graham who allowed us to use her art on the cover and inside.  ESL educators and professional writers joined forces to write prompts, poems, and essays on the value of what bilingual writers bring to English.  The full handbook is available for English learners everywhere and to teachers who support them.  You can download and printout.  Please tell us how you use it and about writing that you do.   “Tell Me More” is here.

 

“Scent of Geranium”

I just found this animated story by Naghmeh Farzaneh who came from Iran to study in the U.S.  Naghmeh struggles so much with the English language and the life but she remembers one thing her mother told her and it helps. This is called, “Scent of  Geranium.”

https://www.nationalgeographic.com/video/shorts/beautiful-animation-shows-what-its-like-to-be-homesick-in-a-new-country/

“Scent of Geranium” was  selected by National Geographic for their Short Film Showcase, “storytelling to change the world.”